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CBSE Notes 2011-2012

Mathematics

CBSE Sample papers for class 10 (X)

CBSE Sample papers for 2011-2012 are available for you to go through and practice. You can download the sample papers for class 10. These sample papers give you some idea of the format you can expected in the actual question paper. They will also give you an some idea of how the questions are organized in the various sections and the level of difficulty.

10 Tips for Better Grades in CBSE Maths

1. Don't just aim for 70%. Aim high and shoot for 100%.

2. When doing your math homework, be neat. It does make a difference.

3. It's not just the answer that counts in math. Much of your grade is based on the intermediate steps in getting to the answer. So show all your work. Your objective should be to convince your teacher that you know how to do the problem.

CBSE Sample papers for 2010

CBSE Sample papers for 2010 are available for you to go through and practice.

You can download the sample papers.

Please Note: The sample papers are only an indication of the format of the actual question paper. They give you an idea of how the questions are organized in the various sections and the approximate level of difficulty.

Success in Mathematics

Studying Math is Different from Studying Other Subjects

  • Math is learned by doing problems. Do the homework. The problems help you learn the formulas and techniques you do need to know, as well as improve your problem-solving prowess.
  • A word of warning: Each class builds on the previous ones, all year long. You must keep up with the Teacher: attend class, read the text and do homework every day. Falling a day behind puts you at a disadvantage. Falling a week behind puts you in deep trouble.
  • A word of encouragement: Each class builds on the previous ones, all year long. You’re always reviewing previous material as you do new material. Many of the ideas hang together. Identifying and learning the key concepts means you don’t have to memorize as much.

Study Time

You may know a rule of thumb about math (and other) classes: at least 2 hours of study time per subject. But this may not be enough!

How to prepare for a Maths Test?

Everyday Study is a Big Part of Test Preparation
Good study habits throughout the year make it easier to study for tests.

  • Do the homework when it is assigned. You cannot hope to cram 3 or 4 weeks worth of learning into a couple of days of study.
  • On tests you have to solve problems; homework problems are the only way to get practice. As you do homework, make lists of formulas and techniques to use later when you study for tests.
  • Ask your Teacher questions as they arise; don’t wait until the day or two before a test. The questions you ask right before a test should be to clear up minor details.

Studying for a Test
· Start by going over each section, reviewing your notes and checking that you can still do the homework problems (actually work the problems again). Use the worked examples in the text and notes - cover up the solutions and work the problems yourself. Check your work against the solutions given.
· You’re not ready yet! In the book each problem appears at the end of the section in which you learned how do to that problem; on a test the problems from different sections are all together.

Problem Solving

Problem Solving (Homework and Tests)

  • The higher the math class, the more types of problems: in earlier classes, problems often required just one step to find a solution. Increasingly, you will tackle problems which require several steps to solve them. Break these problems down into smaller pieces and solve each piece - divide and conquer!
  • Problem types:
    1. Problems testing memorization (”drill”),
    2. Problems testing skills (”drill”),
    3. Problems requiring application of skills to familiar situations (”template” problems),
    4. Problems requiring application of skills to unfamiliar situations (you develop a strategy for a new problem type),
    5. Problems requiring that you extend the skills or theory you know before applying them to an unfamiliar situation
  • When you work problems on homework, write out complete solutions, as if you were taking a test. Don’t just scratch out a few lines and check the answer in the back of the book. If your answer is not right, rework the problem; don’t just do some mental gymnastics to convince yourself that you could get the correct answer. If you can’t get the answer, get help.
  • The practice you get doing homework and reviewing will make test problems easier to tackle.

Tips on Problem Solving

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